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dc.contributor.authorThe Guardian
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T10:30:08Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T10:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-07
dc.identifier.citationThe Guardian. (2019, March 7). Female genital mutilation and human rights. The Guardian p.18en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://tinyurl.com/y23n8dpv
dc.descriptionNewspaper Articleen_US
dc.description.abstractFemale genital mutilation (FGM) involves procedure that alter or injure the female genital for non-medical reasons, it is internationally recognised as a violation of the human rights of girls and woman. FGM primarily, concentrated in 30 African countries but with immigration has extended to Middle East, Asia, Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand thereby becoming a universal problem. FGM commonly referred to as "female circumcision" is a traditional ritual performed on girls at birth, puberty stage, womanhood, marriageable age and even during pregnancy, by traditional practitioners using various unsterilized tools, across most religion has a lot of health implications. It is based on these indices and as part of sustainable development goals that the government of the world, United Nations and non-governmental organisations started a serious lute against FGM.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFederal University of Technology, Owerrien_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherGuardian Newspaper Limiteden_US
dc.subjectGenital Mutilation - femaleen_US
dc.subjectGenital Mutilation - Eradicationen_US
dc.subjectFemale Circumcisionen_US
dc.subjectHealth Implicationen_US
dc.subjectHuman Rights - Girlsen_US
dc.titleFemale Genital Mutilation and Human Rightsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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